Evolutions of Carpe Diem for Learning Design – new paper

The paper Evolutions of Carpe Diem  for Learning Design, co-authored by Professor Linda Creanor, Sheila MacNeill and Julie Usher (University of Northampton) has just been published.

The paper presents a comparative case study from GCU and  Northampton Universtiy that contextualises their use of the Carpe Diem Learning Design methodology.  The aim of the case study is not to share an evaluation of the Carpe Diem process per se, as both institutions are confident in the validity of the design process it scaffolds. Rather, it explores the different contexts, institutional drivers and evolutions of the original process in both institutions: supporting the development of online programmes at Glasgow Caledonian University, and blended programmes through the CAIeRO framework (Creating Aligned Interactive educational Resource Opportunities) at the University of Northampton.

It then shares common challenges and opportunities; in particular the use of Carpe Diem to support open educational practice. The aim is to contribute to an ongoing collaborative narrative around the processes involved in implementing and embedding a formal learning design process such as Carpe Diem.

You can access and download the paper here.

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Catching up with #oer18

The #OER18 conference took place last week in Bristol.  GCU was well represented by Sheila MacNeill (Academic Development) who presented with Professsor Keith Smyth (UHI) on open praxis and practice in the digital university, and Marion Kelt from the Library who presented on the GCU copyright advisor. Sheila is also the current Chair of ALT (Association for Learning Technology) who organise the conference.

There are a growing number of post conference blogs sharing a rang of perspectives and experiences of the conference which can be accessed from the ALTC website.

You can also view recordings of all the keynotes.

New Digital Assessment and Feedback videos for students and staff

In this post, Steven Fraser, Learning Technologist in the Academic Development Team shares the thinking behind some of the resources he has been creating for staff and students as part of the support for the Digital Assessment Policy.

Since I started at GCU I have been hearing various lecturers talk about their individual processes for setting up assessments and giving feedback. In this time it has been frequently mentioned that the lecturers were unaware of what the students see when they access feedback. It had also been mentioned that students themselves were unaware of what to look for when they were receiving their grades and feedback. Various elements of the Turnitin Feedback studio were being ignored. Students had received no information on how to view rubrics, quickmarks or how to listen to audio feedback.

In order to show lecturers what students see and to ensure the students knew how to access their grades and feedback in both Grade Centre and Turnitin, it was decided to create two short videos to explain the process. The first video shows students how to find their feedback in Turnitin, how to view rubrics, play audio feedback, understand similarity reports and how to download their feedback as a .PDF document.

The second video shows students how to access grades and feedback in Grade Centre. Both videos are short in order to allow the viewers to have a quick overview of process and to emphasise how quick an uncomplicated the procedure is. The videos also allow academics to see how students view their feedback without having to login as a student on GCU Learn or use the ‘Student View’ which is not always available.

The videos were recorded using Camtasia, which is a screen recording and video editing software. (NB Camtasia is available to all GCU staff via the GCU App Store)

Using Camtasia allowed me to focus on different topics, make a recording and then edit the different sections of the video together. I could then record my voice over to explain what is happening on screen. This technique ensured the videos were short, succinct and to the point. I also added subtitles to the videos, so they could be more accessible to individuals who have hearing impairments.

The two videos are available from the links below.

Video 1 – Student Feedback in Turnitin 

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Video 2 – Student Feedback Grade Centre

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You can find out more about our other assessment and feedback resources and staff development opportunities in the Digital Assessment and Feedback Community in GCU Learn.